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Flying Circle Releases New Line of Gun Cases

Flying Circle Releases New Line of Gun Cases/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f378d3a01706_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f378d3a01706_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Flying Circle Bags has released a slew of new gun cases. This includes a handy waist pack that fits nearly any revolver or compact/sub-compact pistol. "Flying Circle Bags" has earned top marks as a soft luggage manufacturer. Now the Texas-based company is taking aim at shooters, expanding its catalog with a new line of gun cases for every type of firearm. When it comes to soft luggage, Flying Circle Bags has been a favorite of both military and civilian consumers. Now, the Texas manufacturer is aiming to please gun owners of both communities. Flying Circle announced recently it is expanding its catalog to include gun cases, a selection that covers nearly every conceivable type of firearm. In all, the company has introduced five new cases, the majority designed purely for firearms transportation. The company has, however, come up with some solutions for tasks other than getting a gun from point A to point B. One of the most eye-catching is Flying Circle’s Concealed Carry Waist Pack. Related GunDigest Articles Firing Line Video: Swagger Bipod Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles While off-body carry isn’t always ideal, it is sometimes the only practical choice. Flying Circle makes the decision a bit easier with its pack offering a multitude of features right in line with the needs of most people who concealed carry. Perhaps the handiest feature of the pack is the inclusion of a versatile holster in the main compartment. The inclusion of a removable, ambidextrous holster ensures a handgun is always at the ready, facilitating rapid access to the firearm's grip and a clean draw from the pack. The holster fits nearly any compact or sub-compact pistol and can be further adjusted to present the firearm at the most convenient angle. The pack is adjustable to nearly any body size with a belt that can fit up to a 42-inch waist. It also comes outfitted with a side release buckle that is concealed to keep it secure. The pack’s padded back with mesh vent fabric adds to its comfort. And it has extra room to store more than just a handgun. A front zipper pocket provides space for keys, wallet and what have you.

Taurus 627 Revolver Review

Taurus 627 Revolver Review

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s You may remember that I reviewed the Smith & Wesson 686 . In that review, I discovered that I don’t, in fact, hate revolvers. Who knew? Anyway, tragedy of tragedies: I had to give the 686 back to my friend.  Pro tip: buy the gun from a person BEFORE you publish a glowing review of it.  So there I was revolverless and in need of a revolver. Taurus Time Now, I’ll admit that there are a disproportionate number of Taurus gun reviews on this site but I assure you they’re not a sponsor.  With this being a beginner focused site, Taurus and their low prices tend to be most people’s first gun. It also means that, since I have a wife that I’m putting through college, it’s easier for me to afford a Taurus in cases like this where I’m reviewing a gun I actually own as opposed to a borrowed, rented or T&E gun. So yeah, I got a Taurus 627 . Truth be told, now that I’ve shot this gun, I’m glad I got this over the Smith & Wesson.  A little warning: there’s going to be a lot of comparisons between this gun and the S&W. Feature wise, the Taurus has a lot more going for it. I like the grip of the Taurus better, for starters.  My fingers never truly fit right on the S&W’s grip and, had I bought it from the friend, the first thing I would have done would be to put a different grip on it. Secondly, I like the longer barrel of the Taurus.  The longer sight radius really makes for great accuracy.  It also holds seven rounds as opposed to the S&W’s six.  Like the S&W, the Taurus 627 also has adjustable rear sights which did require a bit of adjusting right out of the box. Finally, we come to the porting on the barrel. In a normal barrel, the gasses that propel the bullet will escape from the end of the barrel once the bullet leaves.  That sudden pop of pressure contributes greatly to the muzzle flip of the gun and increases that dreaded “felt recoil”. By drilling a bunch of upward pointing holes on the end of the gun, most of the gasses escape in that upward direction before the bullet leaves the barrel.  This pretty much removes the muzzle flip caused by those gasses and actually works to counteract the recoil caused by the natural physics of the gun firing in the first place.  This was the first gun I’ve ever fired that had a ported barrel and let me tell you: it has spoiled me. The difference was amazing ! While the weight of this gun had a bit to do with it, the combination of that and the ported barrel meant that .38 special rounds had, at least to me, less recoil than the .380 SIG P238 that Mrs. Noob was shooting in the next lane over. The recoil was so light that, after the first shot, I actually unloaded the remaining 6 rounds to check for a squib because I could have sworn it was a bad cartridge. Nope, the recoil was just that light. Like a little kid, I excitedly called the wife over saying “SWEETY! YOU GOTTA TRY THIS YOU GOTTA TRY THIS YOU GOTTA TRY THIS!!!!” all the while bouncing up and down like a hyperactive terrier.  With an air of skepticism (and slight annoyance by my excited nature), she gave it a try.  After firing the first round, the look of shock on her face was priceless!  She immediately looked at the gun and said a phrase I can’t repeat here due to the PG-13 nature of the site but it rhymed with “Foley Spit”.  After that, I had trouble getting the gun back from her so that I could finish the testing. Taurus 627 As light as the recoil was with .38 special, I was expecting the .357 magnum to be light as well. To the gun’s credit, it didn’t have much in the way of muzzle flip.  Wooo boy the recoil was still there, though.  The weird thing was, I felt almost all of it in my shoulders.  I can honestly say I’ve never shot a gun that felt like this before.  I really want to try a ported semi-auto pistol to see if it has similar characteristics! In the review, I spent a bit of time waxing poetic about the trigger on the S&W as well. I’m happy to report that the trigger on the Taurus is also a great trigger.  In single action, the trigger feels a bit heavier than the the S&W’s trigger did.  This is a good thing as it’s harder to accidentally fire the Taurus 627 when it’s in single action mode.  There isn’t any grittiness or sponginess in the 627’s trigger pull. My only complaint is that there seems to be a false reset point a little bit before the actual reset.  In times of rapid fire, this could throw off a shooter so be aware of it. I can’t think of a clever segue to go here so let’s just get to the tests. Revolver.  No breakdown. 5 out of 5 Under normal circumstances, this is an automatic 5 out of 5 but, those holes in the barrel become a bit of a double edged sword. They do truly help recoil but they are a pain to clean. They do need to be cleaned also because the carbon from all that cheap ammo collects in there pretty bad.  As much as I love those things, it does add some extra difficulty in cleaning.  Combine that with the fact that there aren’t many tools readily available to dig into those things (I had to use a dental scraper), the 627 gets a 4.5 out of 5 for maintenance. Revolver and reliable both start with R. 5 out of 5 No external safety.  It has a heavier trigger pull which makes it harder to accidentally shoot. It has an integrated lock that renders the gun unusable (just like all Taurus guns).  It also has what is called a “transfer bar” meaning that the hammer doesn’t actually strike the firing pin directly.  There’s a bar that is raised up between the hammer and pin only when the trigger is pulled which also helps against accidental shooting. By those powers combined, the 627 is probably the most inherently safe revolver I’ve ever tested. 4 out of 5 Just like every revolver, you really have to watch your hand placement or your thumb will suffer.  Not much else to say on that at this point. 3 out of 5 You get a cardboard box, a couple of spare keys, a manual and a warranty card. This is always Taurus’s weak point.  In order to keep the costs down, sacrifices have to be made somewhere.  It’s either drop the quality of the gun or cut the toys in the box.  Still, the category is what it is. 1 out of 5.  A plastic case would have bumped it up to at least a 2. Like any revolver, there isn’t much room for upgrading. The nice thing is, there’s lots of options available for those things that can be upgraded.  There’s no shortage of grip options and I’ve found some interesting trigger upgrades.  Taurus also sells a scope mount that can be clamped on to the gun which has the potential to add some interesting toys.  All in all, I’m not disappointed at the selection available. 5 out of 5 If you’re looking for a revolver to kick off your collection, you really can’t go wrong here. It’s super accurate to shoot.  The recoil won’t scare off noobs and makes it easy to shoot this all day long.  The price is right.  It even looks cool, which is a bonus. The Taurus 627 gets a solid 4 out of 5. Although I will say this: I’m probably not going to do too many more revolver reviews.  They’re fun guns and all but, with the exception of one or two nuances on occasion (i.e. trigger and such), they’re just not unique enough in their function to make for an interesting review. Now, that is actually a plus in the revolver column, if you think about it.  If every revolver behaves almost exactly the same, it makes it far easier to just pick up a revolver and go.  Great for shooters, bad for reviewers.  There’s only so many times I can type “It’s a revolver.  You don’t have to worry about _____”. Comments: Posted @ 3/5/2014 11:11 AM by Kendal Black Heh, heh. You’re hooked now. Welcome to the round side of the force.

Gun Collecting: The Colt Model 1903

Gun Collecting: The Colt Model 1903

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2c20380_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2c20380_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Colt Pocket Hammerless Model 1903 is a very collectible pistol, and a great shooter – even by today's standards. The approach to what we now call a “carry gun” was much different a generation ago. In those halcyon days, most folks tucked a neat little break-action revolver in their waistband or dropped a slim semi-auto in their pocket and went about their business. No one thought this was a menace to civil society. Such practices didn’t evoke mass hysteria in the media, nor were they considered dangerous by anyone, except crooks. The choice of defensive calibers was also much different then. It was determined not only by the petite size of the typical handgun, but also because high-powered antibiotics had not yet become widely available, and someone shot with anything, even a .22, had a good chance of getting a serious infection and heading to their last roundup. It is within this cultural context that we assess the Colt Model 1903 semi-automatic. It is a typical example of the period’s armament that, even today, fits Gun Digest’s honored definition of “One Good Gun.” The M-1903 was designed by none other than John M. Browning and is the culmination of a series of pistols launched in 1896. Browning gave Colt the exclusive right to manufacture pistols of his design and market them, not only in the United States, but in Great Britain and Ireland, as well. The M-1903 shown here is disassembled into its component parts. The recoil spring (called by Colt as the “retractor spring”) has a guide rod and fits into holes in the frame and slide. The eight-round magazine has witness holes to show the number of rounds remaining in it. The gun is easily reassembled. Bone Up On Legendary Colt Firearms A similar agreement was executed between Browning and Belgium’s Fabrique Nationale (FN), in 1897, for Europe, but excluded the three countries noted above. The understanding was that Colt would make locked-breech guns and FN would manufacture blowback guns. While this convoluted arrangement evolved into several models on both sides of the pond in .32, 9mm and .38 calibers, this geographical manufacturing dichotomy would later become significant in the popularity of the M-1903. By 1900, Colt needed a sales success and petitioned Browning to allow them to make a blowback design. FN had introduced the .32 Automatic Colt Pistol (ACP) cartridge, in 1899, in its 1899/1900 pistol. Browning acquiesced, cut a very lucrative deal with Colt, and slightly modified the gun’s design. Thus, in 1902, Colt started production of the Colt Automatic Pistol, Pocket Model (factory designation Model M). The gun went on sale in August of that year and was a huge hit. It was also called the Hammerless Pocket Model; of course, it wasn’t truly hammerless, as the hammer was simply concealed in the frame. Related GunDigest Articles Classic Guns: "Colt Model 1903" Pocket Pistol Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Colt Brings Back Limited Run of Model 1903 Hammerless The M-1903 has a manual safety on the left side of the frame and was the first gun to be offered with a grip safety. Edges and corners were rounded and smoothed so that it was indeed easy to slip into one’s pocket, hence the model’s moniker. The W.C. Wolff Company can supply exact replacement springs for almost any rifle, shotgun or handgun. Here are new springs for the M-1903 Colt 32 ACP, from left: extractor, firing pin and recoil springs. The magazine and its old spring are at right. Note how it was definitely time for a new spring in the magazine. A Marvel of Simplicity Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The Colt M-1903 is a marvel of simplicity. It is a straight blowback, single-action design with a fixed barrel, and operation is simple forward. A loaded magazine holding up to eight rounds is inserted into the butt, the slide then retracted and released. This cocks the internal hammer, chambers a round from the magazine and then the arm is ready to fire. The manual safety can be applied at this point for pocket or holster carry. Upon firing, the slide moves back, the fired case is ejected, and what Colt called the “retractor spring” on its guide beneath the barrel returns the slide into battery, stripping the next cartridge in line off the top of the single-stack magazine. The slide does not remain locked open after the last shot. Disassembly is likewise easy and straightforward. Remove the magazine and make sure the chamber is empty. Pull the slide back to cock the hammer and release. Move the slide back until the takedown arrow on the left front of the slide is even with the front edge of the frame, and rotate the barrel to the left. The slide with the barrel can then be pulled forward and off the frame, and then the retractor spring and its guide may be removed, if desired. To remove the barrel from the frame, turn it back to its original position and pull the barrel out of the slide. Reassembly is basically in the reverse order, but you have to turn the barrel ever so slightly to get the slide back far enough to lock the barrel lugs into their corresponding cuts in the frame. The M-1903 was designed by John M. Browning and is a single-action blowback with an eight-round magazine in the grip. A thumb safety on the left side of the frame and a grip safety made the arm relatively safe for pocket carry, which aided its popularity. My Model 1903 I stumbled across my Model 1903 via a multi-item trade with a good friend who always seems to have something interesting with which to tempt the unsuspecting gun writer. Being a handloader at heart, the deal clincher was that the gun came with a huge jar containing hundreds of once-fired .32 ACP cases! While my M-1903 is a quaint little gun, it’s obviously somewhat of an amalgamation. Five major variations (some say four) of the M-1903 were made over its production life from 1903 to 1946, with a total of about 572,215 .32s produced. In 1908, a version chambered for the .380 ACP was introduced, known as the Model 1908. This resulted in the production of another 138,010 guns. (M-1908s in .380 could be easily converted to .32 ACP, but not vice versa.) My .32 ACP is a “Type III” specimen, made from 1910 to 1926, with some 363,046 guns being produced in that period. The Type III guns eliminated the barrel bushing and magazine safety of earlier versions. The minutiae of the numerous design changes over all the production periods have delighted Colt collectors for decades. My gun’s magazine is original, marked “CAL 32 COLT,” but its spring has lost its zip and the last round or two sometimes fails to feed. Not to worry. If a gun has a spring problem, there’s only one place to call: Wolff Gun Springs.

Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870: 12 Gauge Shotgun Reviews

Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870: 12 Gauge Shotgun Reviews

Advertisment The Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870. Which is better? There are two true titans of shotguns in the American firearms industry, and they go by Mossberg and Remington. Both of these classic American companies have been around the block a time or two, and both produce a variety of weapons. In the same way that Ruger is well known for their rifles , these companies are both most well known for their immensely popular shotguns. Remington produces a few different shotguns, but the mainstay of their shotgun line is the Model 870. The Model 870 was first produced in 1950, and it has quickly risen to become the most popular shotgun in Remington’s catalog. The 870 has a storied history of use by hunters, sports shooters, police officers, and soldiers. Mossberg also produces a variety of shotguns in pump and semi-auto platforms, and back in the day, they produced bolt action shotguns. The Mossberg 500 is their famed pump action shotgun and began production in 1960.  I’m going to break down both of these into more detail, in an attempt to showcase the differences and similarities like one of our other authors did here between the AR-15 and AK-47 . Let’s get into the Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870. Contents Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870: Overview My Experience Commonalities Differences Between Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870 1. Materials 2. Mechanics 3. Controls 4. Service History 5. Customizability 6. Price 7. Variations Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870: Parting Shots Remington 870 Pros: Mossberg 500 Pros: Which is Better? Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870: Overview The Remington 870 served in various wars and is the armory of the Coast Guard, Airforce, the Navy, and various National Guard units. I even own an Army model M870 riot gun from the Ohio National Guard. The Remington 870 has a wide variety of different variations available including slug guns, trap guns, tactical models, and more. Remington produces different grades of guns with the Express and Tactical models being the cheaper models. This includes functional but less pretty finishes, as well as plastic trigger guards, and dimpled magazine tubes that make it difficult to add a magazine tube extension. The Wingmaster and Police models are the higher end guns with metal trigger guards, a better finish, and undimpled magazine tubes. The Mossberg 500 is an entire family of guns which includes the Mossberg 590 and 590A1. The Mossberg series of shotguns have also served across the country in the arms of soldiers, Marine and police forces. At one point in my infantry career, I was issued a Mossberg 590 with a 14-inch barrel. The Mossberg 500 is an immensely popular weapon with hunters as well. There are a massive amount of Mossberg 500 variations. The 500 is the most common variant and comes in tactical, security, and field models as well as NFA SBR and AOWs. The magazine cap design does not allow you to extend the capacity of a Mossberg 500 without completely replacing the tube. The 590 and 590A1 models feature a heavy walled barrel and easily extendable magazine tubes. The 590A1 is the only one to feature a metal trigger guard and trigger. My Experience When it comes to articles that are considered versus articles, it’s hard to find an honest assessment due to brand loyalty. It happens, and I’m not immune to this. Have me write a Glock vs. CZ article, and you’ll see CZ bias. However, when it comes to the Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870, I feel pretty neutral on the topic. I own multiple versions of both guns. This includes my first gun ever, the Remington 870 410. It also includes different variations including an antique, a retired and beat up police gun, and even off-the-wall designs. Sometimes I like a Remington variation of a gun and vice versa. The good news is, both guns are very well made and are perfect for hunting, home defense, competition, and duty use. Commonalities These guys have a ton in common. This is partially why a Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870 review is hard to write. First and foremost, they are both pump-action shotguns. They are both available in the big three shotgun calibers, which are 12 and 20 gauge as well as 410 bore. Both use dual action bars in their pump, and both have field models with a variety of interchangeable chokes. Both guns also feed from a tube magazine on most models. The tube magazine is placed below the barrel and varies in length to accommodate more or less rounds. You can also easily switch barrels on each gun which leads to both companies offering guns with both short and long barrels. Both guns are also very easy to customize. "Differences Between Mossberg" 500 vs. Remington 870 The differences between the guns are where things start to get fun. I own a variety of Mossberg’s and 870s in a variety of configurations. The differences are small in the long run, but substantial enough to make a big difference between the guns. 1. Materials One of the biggest differences is what the receivers are made out of. Mossberg goes with a lighter aluminum receiver. This often leads to the guns being up to a half pound lighter. Aluminum also does not rust. However, the Mossberg does use steel in parts like the barrel that will rust. Remington goes with a full steel receiver. This makes the receiver stronger ultimately, but the difference strength wise would not necessarily be noticed by the end user. The steel receiver’s weight isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Weight absorbs recoil and shotguns in 12 gauge have some significant recoil. It’s a coin toss if one is better than the other. In certain roles, the lightweight is a much nicer feature. For example, a breaching shotgun is carried with an additional weapon, and in that role, the lighter gun is better. However, in a role where the shotgun is the main fighting weapon the additional weight may be preferred. 2. Mechanics On the inside, the guns are not too dynamically different. They do have a lot of basic similarities, and there are only two major differences between the two on the insides of the gun. The first is the extractor, or in the case of the Mossberg, extractors. The Mossberg 500 family of guns have two extractors, which are easy to change by the end user. A Youtube video can walk you through it. The Remington 870 has a single extractor, and you have to send it in or find a gunsmith to replace it. Another big difference is the shell lifter. The Mossberg 500 model is kept in the up position when the action is closed. This makes loading the weapon easier and less likely to pinch or be cumbersome. This skeletonized lifter is also easy to work with if you have to clear a jam or malfunction. The Remington’s always in the down position. The upside is that the internals is better protected due to the lifter acting as a gate that blocks debris from getting inside the gun. 3. Controls The controls of both guns vary, and the biggest variance comes via the safety of each gun. The Mossberg features a top mounted tang safety that is ambidextrous and easy to use with your standard shotgun stock. The Mossberg 500 safety is absolutely fantastic for left-handed users. In general, with a traditional shotgun stock, the Mossberg 500 safety is larger and easier to use. The Remington 870 features a small cross tang safety located just behind the trigger and placed on the right-hand side. The 870 is trickier to use for lefties due to the safety’s position. The Remington 870’s safety does work well with a traditional shotgun stock as well as a pistol grip or pistol grip and stock equipped weapon. The second difference is the placement of the slide releases. When the gun is cocked, the pump is locked into position. The pump can be released by pushing the slide release. This unlocks the slide and allows the weapon to be pumped. Both slide releases are on the left side of the trigger guard. The Remington places the release in front of the trigger and Mossberg places it behind the trigger. Each is easy to reach and access. With my trigger finger, I can activate the slide release on the 870. On the Mossberg, I can use my thumb or my middle finger to activate the slide release. I don’t see an advantage to one over the other. The Remington uses a single piece slide assembly and action bars. The design is more likely to bend and need to be replaced. The design also gives the end user a smoother overall action and has less slop when the gun is pumped. The Mossberg 500 uses a slide assembly with the action bars pinned to it. The pinned design means the bars are much less likely to bind and bend. The downside is the overall sloppier and grittier action Mossberg shotguns have when being pumped. 4. Service History Regarding Police use, it’s hard to say which gun is used more for police work than the other. Both guns have found their way into thousands of patrol cars across the United States at any given time. In terms of military use both have also been used relatively extensively. The Remington MCS system is one of the most modular shotguns for military applications. However, the Mossberg is the more common military shotgun. It’s the only shotgun to pass the U.S. Army’s Mil-Spec 3443E test. This is basically a torture test and MIL-Spec guide for pump action shotguns. The US Army is busy adopting the X26 shotgun, and the Marine Corps has made the Benelli M1014 as their standard shotgun. With that said the Mossberg 590s are much more common in the hands of Marines when I left in 2013. 5. Customizability Both guns are immensely customizable. If a company makes shotgun accessories they likely make accessories for both the 870 and Mossberg 500 series of guns. This includes stocks, red dot sights , scope mounts, flashlights, pumps and more.  You can swap every part of the gun to build your own custom shotgun. Something should be said regarding custom shops. Most custom shops, like a big majority, use the Remington 870 as their base. This includes Wilson Combat and Nighthawk. If you want a high-end custom pump shotgun, the Remington 870 seems to be the way to go. As a side note, Mossberg used to make a muzzleloading barrel for Mossberg 500’s. These gave your gun a two-season versatility that was unbeatable for a budget gun. An aftermarket company produced 870 muzzleloader barrels, but they are few and far between. The Mossberg barrels are quite easy to find at this moment, even though Mossberg discontinued them. 6. Price When it comes to the cost of each gun Mossberg tends to be a hair cheaper than Remington, often being only tens of dollars. Other situations may have the Mossberg paired with it like an additional barrel for a lower price than a standard Remington. The Remington’s steel receiver certainly adds to the cost of the gun. 7. Variations Both Mossberg and Remington both variations of all kinds for different uses. This includes breaching guns, AOWs, field guns, and tactical models of various sizes. Both companies like to go one for one when they introduce a new model. If Mossberg introduces a new type of Mossberg 500, you’ll likely see Remington release an 870 and vice versa. In 2017 Mossberg released the 590 Shockwave, a firearm that by law is not a shotgun. It sports a short 14-inch barrel and bird’s head grip. Normally this would be an NFA controlled weapon, but due to a small loophole, it is not. Remington followed up shortly after with the Remington Tac 14, an 870 version with the same idea. Following that, in late 2017 Remington released the 870 DM which was a magazine fed shotgun built on the 870 design. Lo, and behold at SHOT Show 2018 Mossberg released their magazine fed pump action shotgun. This brings us to my conclusion, and that is that Mossberg needs Remington and Remington needs Mossberg. They push each other forward and force each other to innovate and become better. Mossberg 500 vs. Remington 870: Parting Shots Remington 870 Pros: Steel receiver gives you a more recoil proof gun It’s much easier to use pistol grips and pistol grip stocks Smoother overall action and the gun is often the choice starting model for high-end custom shotguns Mossberg 500 Pros: Better safety placement for lefties and more intuitive with standard stocks Easier to fix and replace parts at home with Typically cheaper when contrasted with comparable 870s Which is Better? Is one ultimately the better gun? That’s a hard one to call. Both are fantastic firearms and have been around for so long for a reason. If I were going to combat now, I’d likely choose the Mossberg 590A1. I find it to be the slightly better gun with a few features I prefer in my shotguns. Would I frown if I was handed a Remington 870 instead? Nope, I’d be plenty happy with an 870 as well.

What Guns Did People Panic Buy During COVID & Protests 2020?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Eric Hung from Pew Pew Tactical shares his data with Gun Sports Radio on what people panic bought during COVID and BLM Protests. Plus the origins and future of Pew Pew Tactical! Check out the entire segment HERE. "Gun Sports Radio"

Rifle Shooting Basics: The Long-Forgotten Loop Sling

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d8ee6038_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d8ee6038_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } In sitting position with support forearm wrapped around sling and hand between sling and stock and wedged against front swivel. One of the most useful rifle shooting aids is also one of the most neglected. That is the use of the loop sling. The support and steadiness it provides, when properly used, is enormous. The hasty sling in offhand. Note rear strap across chest. Contrary to what you may have read before, the loop sling does not “tie the rifle to your shoulder,” or to your arm for that matter. What it does is to replace your support arm bicep muscle in holding up the weight of the rifle, not only taking one more trembling muscle out of the picture, but also preventing the support arm elbow joint angle from opening up and lowering the rifle, and even helping support the weight of the upper body in certain positions. While proper use of the shooting loop sling was long a staple of military training and was well known amongst hunters, the military started getting away from teaching it in the years after the Korean War. As a result, the knowledge of how to use this handy technique has all but disappeared from both the military and civilian worlds of riflery. This is a shame, as a properly set-up sling is a major aid to gaining a steady position. Col. Cooper’s observations, if I recall correctly, were that the shooting loop sling is useful in perhaps 60% of rifle hunting situations, and increases your steadiness by about 30%. I personally think he was being conservative. Related GunDigest Articles Video: Action Rifle Shooting with Jerry Miculek Video: Practical Rifle Shooting Positions in the Field Video: Mastering the Basics of Precision Shooting The best use of the shooting loop sling requires the support arm elbow (left elbow if you shoot righty) to be rested on a support. This can be a log, car hood (if legal for hunting in your state – it’s not in mine!), the ground (in prone), or your own leg (kneeling, squatting, or sitting). Sliding the loop all the way up your support upper arm can be done quickly with practice so when you get into position your rifle is steadied. When your elbow is hanging in the air you still have to use your support-side shoulder (front deltoid) muscle to hold everything up, so much of the steadiness a loop sling affords is wasted, since the only muscle it replaces is the bicep. If your elbow is not supported you can’t truly relax your support arm from shoulder to fingertips. If the situation calls for – and allows – the taking of any position or rest where the support arm elbow is planted on something solid, the shooting sling is the quickest, simplest, and least cumbersome steadiness aid there is. Got a bipod? Fine. How much weight does it add to your rifle, and how long does it take to deploy it and adjust its length properly? Carrying shooting sticks? Okay, how do you like carrying them all day? How much movement do you make setting them up properly?

Summary

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